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Toshiba, Ormat commission first unit of $1.17bn geothermal plant in Indonesia

EBR Staff Writer Published 22 March 2017

Toshiba and Ormat Technologies have commissioned the first 110MW unit of the $1.17bn Sarulla geothermal power plant located in North Sumatra, Indonesia.

Said to be one of the world's largest of its kind, the 320.8MW power plant uses Toshiba's flash and Ormat's binary technologies to provide a high efficiency and 100% reinjection of the exploited geothermal fluid.

The power plant, which is planned to be developed in three phases of 110MW each, is operated by Sarulla Operations (SOL), a consortium comprising Itochu with 25% stake, Kyushu Electric Power 25%, PT Medco Power Indonesia 18.9975%, Inpex 18.2525% and Ormat International 12.75%.

As project participant, Toshiba was responsible for the supply of geothermal steam turbines and generators (STGs) for the flash systems.

Additionally, Ormat provided the conceptual design of the Geothermal Combined Cycle Unit (GCCU) power plant.

It also provided its Ormat Energy Converter (OEC) designed to serve as the condensing units for the steam turbines and utilize the separated brine for maximum resource exploitation and maximum power output.

Ormat CEO Isaac Angel said: “We continue to share our expertise as work continues on the second and third units of the Sarulla project that are expected to come on line by 2017 and 2018, respectively.

“Ormat’s proven GCCU technology, which was also utilized in the Sarulla reservoir, will assure optimal and sustainable utilization of the resource to deliver to Indonesia clean, cost effective and baseload capacity.”

Hyundai Engineering and Construction is the engineering, procurement and construction contractor for the geothermal project.


Photo: The Sarulla geothermal plant is located in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Photo: courtesy of Toshiba Corporation.